Jack’s Pittsburgh American Numismatic Association Coin Show Report

I love coin shows because I never know what I will find.  Last Thursday was no different. I arrived at the Pittsburgh Convention Center and hit the ground running. Within minutes I ran into an old friend who had a really cool group of 1882 Morgan Dollars.  All were certified at different levels of Mint State but had obviously been stored together forever.  They all had the exact same beautiful original toning.  He admitted to me that they had been in old paper envelopes and were purchased from a small local auction house in Long Island, NY.  All were lovely and graded between MS62 and MS65. There was no passing on this deal.

After perusing the floor for several hours and finding a few more goodies it was off to dinner with some coin dealer friends. It was at dinner this evening that I was offered the single most unusual item of my entire career, although not quite numismatic. As I enjoyed my appetizer and Belgian brown ale the offer came… “You wanna sell a dinosaur?” Well not quite art or coins but a pretty cool offer. I politely said I would talk to Barry, but didn’t really think it was for us.

On the way back to my hotel I passed this bar, and although I didn’t have time to stop for a night cap, I couldn’t miss the photo opportunity.

Friday was another whirlwind day. I scoured the floor looking for anything unusual.  I landed in front of the table of a good friend from New Jersey.  We discussed the coin market in general and more specifically Chinese coins after seeing an attractive silver dollar sized Chinese coin in his case.  He noted that he purposefully made sure to have one Chinese coin to make sure everyone looked in his case.  The Chinese market has been super hot over the last year or so.  There is one coin called the “Auto Dollar” which I have always wanted.  This is a coin that sold for $1,500- $3,000 in Uncirculated condition 2-3 years ago. I was kicking myself a few months back when I saw an About Uncirculated example sell in auction for $74,000.  Holy cow, what a crazy increase in value!  I guess that’s what happens when a billion people decide they want to collect coins.

I hoofed the floor a bit more looking for a few hidden gems, but it was tough. I tried hard to buy anything with nice toning, but everything was priced 5 to 10 times more than I was willing to pay. The only Redfield Dollar I found was one that I had basically bought a week earlier. A friend bought it in a deal and agreed to sell it to me when we met in Pittsburgh.  I did get a lead on some colonial currency, but we’ll see what happens.  I love this historical type of material.  I snooped around for a while more but didn’t find anything too intriguing.

Then it was off to the auction to try to buy something super special. I sat in the room which was not nearly as crowded as I had anticipated. This was good- less competition.  I anxiously anticipated the lot and my heart was pounding as it approached.  After a brief flurry of bidding the coin was ours.  Art and Coin Television were the owners of something unique and truly special.  Unfortunately I am not at liberty to divulge what exactly we bought, but it is an unbelievable, mind blowing coin.  I have seen a lot in my day including several million dollar rarities, but I don’t think I’ve ever seen a coin quite like this.  I’m sure Barry will clue everyone in soon, so keep tuning in.

After the auction I ran around and found a few more nice deals for both television and for the website.  Later it was back to view more auction lots.  This is actually more work than one would expect.  There are always a lot of what I call “trap” lots.  These are coins that might seem nice at first glance but have some hidden problem. I looked at as many coins as humanly possible for about 3 hours until I was told that the viewing period was over and I had to leave.  I somehow timed this perfectly and saw every coin I was interested in (about 400).

This photo was actually taken during set up, so the room is pretty empty.

I ran back to my hotel to review my notes and figure my bids.  This is way trickier than it sounds.  I want buy things, but I don’t want to over pay.  The problem with auctions is that most people get caught up in the moment and pay way too much for coins. I don’t. I eventually was able to get all of my bids together and faxed over to the auction house since I would be on a plane during the next morning’s session. At long last it was time for bed.

I won’t bore you with all of the details of Saturday but I will give a brief synopsis. Wake up early, taxi, plane, another airplane, car.  About ten hours later I was home.  With some time left to spend with my family and even catch much of the Saturday night Coin Show with surprise guest Shawn Leflar.  Great show Shawn!

Well, hopefully you enjoyed my first show report.  I hope it was entertaining and gives you a glimpse of what it is like to search out those hidden gems that Barry is able to offer.  It’s not easy finding amazing quality coins at the best possible price, but I love doing it.

Check back next week and I’ll give you a brief history of all of the US mints. Thanks for reading.

You can contact Jack at jack@artandcointv.com

  

You Might Also Like...
Gallery owner Herbert Remmert looks at recently discovered paintings of German artist Otto Dix during an exhibition in his gallery in Duesseldorf, August 31, 2011. Four paintings by expressionist artist Otto Dix, famous for works critical of the darker sides of German society in the 1920s, were discovered among the belongings of his wife, a gallery owner said on Wednesday. The three watercolours and one painting-study were found in a portfolio untouched for decades in an estate in Bavaria owned by the ancestors of Duesseldorf art collectors who were close to Dix. REUTERS/Ina Fassbender.
A gallery has discovered four paintings by Otto Dix, the German expressionist whose art chronicled the horrors of World War One, the depravity of the Weimar Republic and was labeled ...
READ MORE
Extension Kunsthaus Zürich. View across Heimplatz to the façade with the new main entrance. Status: 2011 after conclusion of preliminary design project© David Chipperfield Architects.
The preliminary design project for the extension to the Kunsthaus Zürich is now complete. The design by David Chipperfield’s multi-award-winning team of architects has assumed its definitive form. ...
READ MORE
Giorgione’s Portrait of a Woman
Art and science may seem like polar opposites—one is creative, the other is purely logical—but the two subjects are closer than you think. In fact, recent scientific discoveries may lead ...
READ MORE
Ahmed Mater (b. 1979). Magnetism. Photogravure etching. 2011 © Ahmed Mater and the Trustees of the British Museum.
Hajj: journey to the heart of Islam will be the first major exhibition dedicated to the Hajj; the pilgrimage to Mecca (Makkah) in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia which is ...
READ MORE
An 1888 poster by Louis Schmidt advertising the Berlin electricity company. The poster is among a collection of more than 4,000 that the Deutsches Historisches Museum has to return to the heir of Hans Sachs. Source: Osen LLC via Bloomberg
Germany’s leading historical museum must return a collection of more than 4,250 rare posters seized by the Nazis to the American son of a Jewish dentist who fled Germany, the ...
READ MORE
A high-resolution zoomable gallery of the objects, many of them previously unavailable online, allows students and teachers to examine the pieces in remarkable detail.
Seven premier cultural organizations in the city have joined forces to develop “The Civil War in Art: Teaching & Learning through Chicago Collections” (civilwarinart.org), a new web-based resource featuring nearly ...
READ MORE
Miguel Covarrubias, Bather Holding Up Her Kemban, 1934. Gouache on masonite, 29¾ x 29¾ in. Photo: Christie's Images Ltd 2012.
On May 22 and 23, Christie's Latin American sale will offer an exceptional selection of works by modern and contemporary masters hailing from Mexico, Venezuela, Brazil, Argentina, Puerto Rico, Colombia, ...
READ MORE
Sotheby's employees in London adjust the original 1967 collage by Peter Blake created for the Beatles album Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. It fetched about $87,720 US at auction. (Alastair Grant/Associated Press)
Sotheby's says an original piece of artwork from the Beatles' "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" album has fetched 55,250 pounds ($87,720) at an auction. The auction house said the original ...
READ MORE
Galerie Remmert und Barth Finds Art German Expressionist
Kunsthaus Zurich Extension To Open In 2017
When Art Meets Science
Hajj: Journey to the Heart of Islam at
German Museum Ordered to Return Collection of Posters
New Website Presenting Civil War Using Chicago Art
Christie’s to Sell Painting by Miguel Covarrubias From
Collage From Beatles Album Fetches $87,720

Be Sociable, Share!
This entry was posted in ACTV Exclusive, Coin News, Coins, Jack McNamara and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

This Post Has 1 Comment

  1. Pingback: Did Someone Say “the Single Finest Graded Morgan Dollar in Existance? | Art and Coin TV Blog

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>